rtamerica
rtamerica:

Nobel Prize winning economist praises $100 bn BRICS bank created to counter Western dominance
Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz has praised the new development bank founded this week by the BRICS countries for creating a financial institution that could counter the Western-dominated IMF and World Bank.
Stiglitz, a professor at Columbia University and former chief economist for the World Bank, said the New Development Bank marks a “fundamental change in global economic and political power.” He added that the effort by Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa (BRICS) could revitalize the way funds are distributed to developing nations in a changing global economy that the “old institutions”like the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank have not adequately recognized.

rtamerica:

Nobel Prize winning economist praises $100 bn BRICS bank created to counter Western dominance

Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz has praised the new development bank founded this week by the BRICS countries for creating a financial institution that could counter the Western-dominated IMF and World Bank.

Stiglitz, a professor at Columbia University and former chief economist for the World Bank, said the New Development Bank marks a “fundamental change in global economic and political power.” He added that the effort by Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa (BRICS) could revitalize the way funds are distributed to developing nations in a changing global economy that the “old institutions”like the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank have not adequately recognized.

hellfireandfeminism
america-wakiewakie:

Legal weed’s race problem: White men get rich, black men stay in prison | Salon
Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize.
But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.
“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”
Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)
Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.
“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.
“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”
As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

Legal weed’s race problem: White men get rich, black men stay in prison | Salon

Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize.

But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”

Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)

Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.

“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.

“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”

As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.

(Read Full Text)

A Huge Bummer about Tumblr

A 5,000 word article about Detroit’s water shortage, complete with interviews, statistics, etc. from a reputable journalistic source = 350 notes

"GUYS DID YOU KNOW DETROIT HAS NO WATERRR" = 200,000 notes.

One of the things that distinguishes Tumblr from Twitter is in its ability to provide context, in its ability to trade in facts and long-form stories rather than platitudes. Every time I see the latter win out over the former it makes me wonder why such an amazing platform is being used as an echo chamber for one liners. 

america-wakiewakie
america-wakiewakie:

No Charges for Cop Who Killed 13 Year Old Holding Toy Gun | The Free Thought Project 
Sonoma County DA announced on Monday that they will not be filing charges against Deputy Erick Gelhaus who shot a child through the heart, then 6 more times after the first fatal round, on October 22, in Santa Rosa, CA.
The young boy was walking down the street carrying a partially translucent plastic airsoft BB gun that resembled a rifle when he was spotted by Deputy Gelhaus and his partner Michael Schemmel.
Gelhaus ordered Lopez to drop his weapon, possibly confused because the orange tip on the toy was missing.
Lopez then began to turn towards the officer when the officer immediately opened fire, shooting to kill. Gelhaus told investigators that he could not remember if he identified himself as a police officer,
Seven bullets were fired at Andy Lopez within six seconds.  The officer’s report claims that he shot Lopez after he turned towards him with the toy gun, despite bullet wounds in Lopez’s side (which supporters claim may indicate he was struck while turning).
The altercation lasted a total of 19 seconds from the call for backup to “shots fired”.
After the 8th grader was on the ground, having been shot repeatedly, the officers then handcuffed the child’s dead, lifeless body.
New information released yesterday indicates Lopez may have smoked weed in the hours before the incident, the report states that he would likely have had “impaired judgement, slowed decision making and increased mental processing time, particularly when having to deal with performance of sudden, unanticipated tasks, including decisions that require a quick response.”
Jonathan Melrod, attorney and extremely dedicated activist, said the decision was based on “patent lies.”
“The police feel that we, the community, are their enemy, they police us as though they are still in Iraq or Afghanistan.” he stated.  He also said that using marijuana as an excuse is just a way to divert blame to the victim.
“Let’s assume there was THC. Does that justify executing Andy?” he demanded.
Gelhaus is ironically a firearms instructor, as well as a contributing writer to gun publications, despite having once accidentally shot himself in the leg in 1995 as he searched a teenager for weapons.
People gathered to protest the decision last night, and social media was full of cries of “You say justified- We say homicide!” and “Jailhouse for Gelhaus”.
Dozens of protests have been organized, mainly by other children who go by “Andy’s Youth”, and they have been passionate and intense.  From crossing police lines to bravely face off with riot police, marching and storming city council with crosses representing police brutality victims, to shaming killer cops they run into along their marches… these kids have been truly inspiring.
A demonstration to protest the decision was scheduled at the “hall of injustice” for Tuesday at 1pm.
It has yet to be announced if Gelhaus will begin patrolling the streets once again.  Lets hope he doesn’t.
Andy’s life mattered. 

america-wakiewakie:

No Charges for Cop Who Killed 13 Year Old Holding Toy Gun | The Free Thought Project 

Sonoma County DA announced on Monday that they will not be filing charges against Deputy Erick Gelhaus who shot a child through the heart, then 6 more times after the first fatal round, on October 22, in Santa Rosa, CA.

The young boy was walking down the street carrying a partially translucent plastic airsoft BB gun that resembled a rifle when he was spotted by Deputy Gelhaus and his partner Michael Schemmel.

Gelhaus ordered Lopez to drop his weapon, possibly confused because the orange tip on the toy was missing.

Lopez then began to turn towards the officer when the officer immediately opened fire, shooting to kill. Gelhaus told investigators that he could not remember if he identified himself as a police officer,

Seven bullets were fired at Andy Lopez within six seconds.  The officer’s report claims that he shot Lopez after he turned towards him with the toy gun, despite bullet wounds in Lopez’s side (which supporters claim may indicate he was struck while turning).

The altercation lasted a total of 19 seconds from the call for backup to “shots fired”.

After the 8th grader was on the ground, having been shot repeatedly, the officers then handcuffed the child’s dead, lifeless body.

New information released yesterday indicates Lopez may have smoked weed in the hours before the incident, the report states that he would likely have had “impaired judgement, slowed decision making and increased mental processing time, particularly when having to deal with performance of sudden, unanticipated tasks, including decisions that require a quick response.”

Jonathan Melrod, attorney and extremely dedicated activist, said the decision was based on “patent lies.”

“The police feel that we, the community, are their enemy, they police us as though they are still in Iraq or Afghanistan.” he stated.  He also said that using marijuana as an excuse is just a way to divert blame to the victim.

“Let’s assume there was THC. Does that justify executing Andy?” he demanded.

Gelhaus is ironically a firearms instructor, as well as a contributing writer to gun publications, despite having once accidentally shot himself in the leg in 1995 as he searched a teenager for weapons.

People gathered to protest the decision last night, and social media was full of cries of “You say justified- We say homicide!” and “Jailhouse for Gelhaus”.

Dozens of protests have been organized, mainly by other children who go by “Andy’s Youth”, and they have been passionate and intense.  From crossing police lines to bravely face off with riot policemarching and storming city council with crosses representing police brutality victims, to shaming killer cops they run into along their marches… these kids have been truly inspiring.

A demonstration to protest the decision was scheduled at the “hall of injustice” for Tuesday at 1pm.

It has yet to be announced if Gelhaus will begin patrolling the streets once again.  Lets hope he doesn’t.

Andy’s life mattered.